Did you know that half adults in the U.S. drink coffee daily? Ever since its discovery, coffee has grown into a favorite beverage for many.

Coffee has a myriad of health benefits to the human body. These include lowering the risk of type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer’s, and it can also reduce the risk of depression and heart disease, among others.

However, it is the strong taste and rich aroma of ground coffee that makes it irresistible for most. Usually, it’s people’s first drink of the day. On average, Americans spend approximately $1,092 on coffee every year.

As popular as coffee is, it has been surrounded by myths that have affected its consumption. This article sheds light on such myths so that you can be at peace when ordering ground coffee or visiting the best coffee shop Knoxville has to offer.

Coffee Causes Dehydration

The premise of this myth stems from the fact that coffee diuretic, a substance that causes the body to produce urine. Caffeine can increase blood flow through the kidneys, which causes more urine to be produced.

Though evidence suggests that high amounts of caffeine have diuretic effects in some people, moderate consumption of coffee will not cause you to lose more fluid than you take.

In 2014, there was a study conducted on men who drink coffee regularly. The findings suggested that there is no difference in hydration levels between people who drink four 200ml cups of coffee and individuals who drink an equal amount of water.

The researchers went further and measured the men’s urine output along with other hydration markers in their blood over a 24 hour period. The findings suggested that the hydrating qualities of a moderate amount of coffee and water are similar.

Drinking Coffee Stunts Your Growth

Coffee is the second most-consumed caffeinated drink by adolescents in the U.S., only after energy drinks. For many years, teens have been warned against drinking coffee as it can impede bone growth and development.

It is not known where this myth originated. However, in a bid to find out if there is any credibility to it, a study on 81 women aged 12-18 was conducted for six years. Findings early on found an association between caffeine intake and a reduction in calcium absorption, which is vital for bone strength and health.

However, the reduction in calcium absorption is so small that it can be offset by adding 1-2 tablespoons of milk to every 180 ml cup of coffee consumed. As such, scaring your teen from visiting their favorite coffee shop may be overly dramatic.

A Cup of Coffee Can Help You Sober Up

This is definitely the most dangerous coffee myth. Alcohol consumption causes brain processes to slow down, and the sedative properties make people feel tired. The notion that coffee can help you sober up comes from the fact that coffee is a stimulant.

This is one of the main reasons people drink it in the morning. It gives them a jolt of energy to begin the day. Though drinking ground coffee does counteract the sedative properties of alcohol, it will not help you sober up.

As such, you will still be intoxicated since coffee does not reduce alcohol levels in your bloodstream. As such, you may feel sobered up, but your judgment will still be impaired.

Decaf Coffee Has No Caffeine

For people who are sensitive to caffeine or those who wish to reduce their caffeine intake but just can’t resist the taste of coffee, decaffeinated (decaf) is the next best thing.

However, decaf coffee is not free of caffeine. It is simply required to have significantly lower amounts of the substance. Regulations by the USDA state that decaf should not have a caffeine content that exceeds 0.10% on a dry basis in the package. Compared to regular coffee, decaf has 97% less caffeine.

Bottom-Line

Now that you know the truth behind these myths, a cup of your favorite blend at your local coffee will be much sweeter. If you fancy yourself as a true coffee enthusiast, take it a step further and order ground coffee online to develop a recipe that’s just for you.